Employee Engagement Survey Used as Best Communication Tool

86089312_4When you think about conducting an employee survey, consider the benefits of it being one of the best and most significant communication tools you can use at your company.

Employee engagement surveys are not used strictly for collecting feedback. Pre-survey communications; advertising that the survey is coming, should relay survey goals, anonymity and post-survey findings. These communications should come from the organizations top leadership.

  • The first message should be that the organization’s leadership is genuinely interested in what employees have to say.
  • Each question on a survey should be examined thoughtfully to ensure they are consistent with the company goals.
  • Show where there are areas of strengths and weaknesses and communicate to employees how the company intends to change them.
  • On the survey, remember to ask about employee benefits. This may be the only time you can elicit feedback about them.
  • Employees should be able to share their thoughts without retribution when they voice their opinions – whether on an employee survey or in person. Does your company have a culture of trust? If employees do not trust the organization, they may not answer survey questions honestly if they fear retribution.
    Some employees think that online surveys are much less anonymous than paper, because they think their IP addresses will link survey responses to individuals. They must be assured by management that the data and feedback collected will never be singled out or individuals identified. TNS ensures that privacy and anonymity is lock-tight when using our online survey technology.

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Tip 8 – Act On Employee Feedback

Intro: This blog is written to further elaborate with my own views on the “8 Tips to Engage Your Employees” booklet written by our experts. construction-blueprintConducting a survey without acting on the results is like making blueprints for a house, but not building it. Employee engagement surveys are only worth the actions built around them. When posing survey item, “Management at my organization takes action based on employee survey results,” our global research shows a score of 70% favorable for highly engaged employees versus only 2% for the disengaged. It’s really up to the managers and directors to ensure that the results are communicated to the employees and find solutions to problems and congratulate teams on the high marks. If you can’t find the time to conduct meetings on the results, you’re never going to get that house built!

FREE 8 Tips Booklet Going Fast!

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This little booklet speaks to managers and is chock-full of great tips and stats that we at TNS Employee Insights have compiled to illustrate the depth and importance of engaging employees.

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We are happy to announce our brand-new, freshly printed, “8 Tips to Engage Your Employees,” written by our experts in the field.

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One-on-One Psychology Needed to Stimulate Employee Engagement

In my opinion, there are several different levels of employee engagement according to how one experiences his or her world. This coincides with several demographics as well, and not just age, tenure, race, work location, position, which are typically surveyed, but also maturity, heritage and family traditions, education and career aspirations, which reflect an individual’s personality traits. Survey items (questions) zero in on how groups of employees feel collectively about certain topics. Even though written comments are recorded and analyzed as well, they are not addressed on an individual level face to face with an employer. Even an item, “My supervisor treats me with respect and dignity,” is grouped with other employees’ responses.

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Cheerleaders vs. Engaged Employees – What’s the Difference?

Great Webinar Takeaways You’ll Want to Learn More About

RobertBerrierPhDToday’s webinar put a new spin on employee engagement from what I thought it was. Our guest speaker and presenter was Dr. Robert Berrier of Spring International, who gave us a lot to think about when it comes to employee engagement.

From Spring International Website:

“Dr. Robert Berrier is the founder, President and CEO of Spring and chief visionary.  Dr. Berrier’s work focuses on understanding how attitudes drive employee behaviors that link to organizational objectives.  Under Robert’s direction, Spring adapted many of the best techniques of segmentation, brand management and attitude-outcome linkage analysis to the area of employee engagement and communications.”

Dr. Berrier explained how employees need to be recognized, have a good camaraderie with fellow workers, a good sense of self-esteem and sense of achievement in their workplace. Empowerment influences employee engagement and people like to work with a “shared purpose.” These are the essentials of employee engagement. Dr. Berrier spoke about the importance of one’s relationship to their peers, feedback and communication, company image and aligned values with employees’, and personal development for advanced opportunities. These are the cornerstones of what management’s influence is on employees in order to foster a working environment whereby employees want to be engaged. “Employee engagement is a mutual accountability.”

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Blanket Solutions Don’t Solve Engagement Issues

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Often, organizations fall victim to “blanket solutions” geared toward fixing the problems of one type of performer or work group, and it’s usually the lowest performer.  Often, management views low engagement scores, and their initial instinct is to address the causes of these low scores.  As a result, solutions or action plans are created that apply to the whole organization.  However, these sometimes only address a small part of the employee population or a few work teams.

Instead, what managers must do is focus on the larger picture while addressing the trouble spots.  Action planning and process improvement may need to be different for the top performers versus the bottom performers.  Segmenting your work groups into levels of engagement can highlight key differences and help set the framework for development of targeted action plans focused on key work teams.  Managers need to recognize that different interventions may be necessary to bring about change in bottom performers versus top performers

Great Leaders Build Others Up

iconGreat leaders must be able to tap into the skills and resources of those around them. Yet, establishing collaborative relationships is sometimes challenging because people have different backgrounds and experiences.  So, make it a point to recognize each team member’s strengths and weaknesses, understand their capabilities, and continue to nurture and support in a way that allows each to achieve their individual greatness.

Recognize that not all great ideas come from your office but from others on your team.  Tap into the varied skills and wider perspectives of others in order to strengthen organizational goals and objectives.

When you allow people to provide input rather than just tell them what needs to be completed, it builds consensus around goals and is the quickest way to gain success.  Ask your employees, “What are we trying to accomplish?” or “What would you do to accomplish this goal?”

Lead relentlessly, surround yourself with great people and continually build them up!

 

Recognize Employees to Motivate and Boost Productivity

TNS TIP of the Week:  Recognize Employees

CertificateRecognition is a very important motivator for employees because it encourages productivity and helps to drive top performance among employees. TNS research has consistently shown that organizations that provide their employees with recognition on a regular basis outperform organizations that do not engage in a regular recognition program.

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