Is Your Boss Jealous?

worlds_greatest_mean_boss_lady

I’m sure there are plenty of us out there who would just love to walk off their jobs due to having a bad manager, and throw something on the way out. Why is that?

When you first started your job, everything was just peachy, and your new boss didn’t show any signs of maleficence. They call this the honeymoon phase. Then little by little the evil leaked out. Your ideas are no good anymore for some reason, you’re overlooked to attend critical meetings, and in general, your boss is treating you as though you have the plague.

You say you’re a rock star when it comes to your job, and always go above and beyond the call of duty, fully engaged in your work and interested in the company business. You’ve already received 2 glowing annual reviews. You’re well-liked by your peers and little birds land on your shoulders in the morning to help you dress. You’re immaculate about your hygiene, and your attire is always fashion plate worthy. When you smile, your bleached white teeth twinkle. So what’s the beef with your boss?

Aside from not be doing your job correctly, is she* jealous of you? Is she afraid you’ll steal her position? Did you say something hurtful without realizing? There could be a lot of reasons why the boss has suddenly turned mean. If you start going home with this on your mind, and begin to worry, it’s high time to ask her what’s wrong.

Schedule a chat time between the two of you to discuss it. If you’re dealing with someone who is truly vindictive, insecure, and lacks leadership skills, you probably are dealing with a jealous boss. If it’s your work that’s the problem, in my view, this boss would be the type who couldn’t wait to tell you where you’re making mistakes. On the other hand, could it be that she is not telling you what your failings are in order to let you fall? Who knows?

One thing’s for sure, you will never know until you hash it out. Trust your perceptions about this boss as to what kind of personality she possesses, and if you feel that a one on one meeting will end up with your words twisted or misinterpreted, then you had better have a third party present, such as an HR rep, another manager, or coworker whom you can trust.

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What to Do When You Can’t Go To Human Resources for Help

fire_breathing_dragon_by_sandara-d56vmyuSo, you say that your micro-managing boss is a fire-breathing dragon and on your back all day long? You feel like you’re being bullied and you’re this close to telling him or her off and quitting on the spot. But you’re not 16 anymore running back home to your folks announcing you just quit and will find another job next week. You’re much older now with a family to support, mortgage, kids in college, and bills up the ying-yang. Who loses when you walk off the job? Oh, sure, employers suffer having to rehire and spending a couple grand, but they will recuperate. You may not unless you are ultra-savvy in the job market and can snap up jobs quicker than Donald Trump can slip on another gold ring. The majority of us will suffer the consequences of such an irrational move as tempting as it is at the time.

So, walking off the job with a few choice adjectives mumbled under your breath is out of the question. Let’s go to human resources to air grievances! This is the logical and rational approach to getting issues resolved in a calm and democratic way. After all, isn’t that what the rule book advises? Most company handbooks will say similar things such as the following:

Right to Speak:

Every employee has the right and ability to raise issues of concern about the company or about the treatment of an employee confidentially, free from any fear of reprisal.

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Tip 1 – Get to Know Your Employees

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Intro: This blog is written to further elaborate with my own views on the  “8 Tips to Engage Your Employees” booklet written by our experts.

“My supervisor cares about me as a person.” Our research shows that highly engaged employees respond favorably to this survey item by 83%, compared to 4% of the disengaged. I wish there was an item which states, “I can’t wait to get home each day so that I can talk to my loved ones about my work.” If this were an actual survey item, and if it were answered, “Strongly Agree,” then it leads me to think that the person does not confide in others about work or anything else to his or her supervisor. If one were to answer “Disagree,” to that statement, it might be an indication that he or she is satisfied with leaving work at work, and feels free to discuss matters with his or her supervisor without fear of retribution. What kind of a supervisor allows you to feel that way? The answer is one that cares about you as a person. At one time or another, most supervisors were subordinates too, so they should know how the shoe feels on their other foot.

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Employee Engagement Starts with You

http://www.sxc.hu/browse.phtml?f=download&id=1151651Last week, I wrote a blog about supervisors’ and managers’ responsibility for employee engagement and some psychology that goes along with it. There is only so much that employers and supervisors can do in order to ensure engagement, the rest is up to the individual.

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Time Out for Office Yoga!

yoga_atdeskI was talking to my colleague earlier today about exercise at the office, and she showed me a nifty device she is wearing called “Fitbit.” This is a tiny device you can clip on your belt, or wear like a watch. During the day, it tracks your steps, distance, calories burned, and stairs climbed. At night, it measures your sleep quality, helps you learn how to sleep better, and wakes you in the morning. The cost is anywhere from $55 – $129.

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What is OHP and OSH?

by Katherine Razzi

Occupational Health Psychology (OHP), a relatively new discipline, emerged from two distinct applied psychology disciplines, health psychology and industrial and organizational (I/O) psychology, as well as occupational health.  According to Wikipedia, “[OHP] concerns the application of psychology to improving the quality of work life, and to protecting and promoting the safety, health and well-being of workers.  OHP is concerned with psychosocial factors in the work environment and the development, maintenance, and promotion of employee health and that of their families. OHP includes a number of other disciplines, occupational sociology, industrial engineering, economics, preventive medicine, public health and others.

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